Mover Kit – The first active wearable that kids make & code




Our Kickstarter campaign has ended, what a journey! 

Thank you SO MUCH to each and every one of you, you have been a huge part of the next step for Technology Will Save Us. 

Mover Kit – The first active wearable that kids make & code




We’re now busy producing your Movers, painting rainbow snap bands, packaging everything and getting the coding platform ready for your awesome inventions! 

You can stay up to date with the Mover journey by signing up to our email updates.

Forbes’ Toy to Watch in 2016

This DIY wearable aims to make kids fearless about technology” — The Verge

The Mover is a STEM toy, for sure, but it’s also a Trojan Horse for getting kids started on computational thinking” — Wired

Youngsters can gamify everyday tasks such as brushing their teeth or make sports activities more fun” — LSN:Global

This kit isn’t just about building – the real creativity lies in the fact kids can decide what the rules are themselves and make and code them” — Forbes

What is the Mover Kit?

The Mover Kit is an intuitive way for kids ages 8 and over to learn the fundamentals of electronics, programming and solve problems creatively. It encourages kids to learn by doing what they do best – being active and playing!

Right now we are production ready and are turning to you, the Kickstarter community, to get the Mover Kit into the hands of kids everywhere.

As seen on…

We’ve had such wonderful reviews already from BBC News, Fast Company, Forbes, Wired, The Verge, BoingBoing, Wall Street Journal, Cool Mom Tech, Creative Review and Geek Dad!

READ  Automotive sensor needs no PCB

How it works

You build it yourself: Straight out of the box, kids (and parents!) can connect the electronics, case, and accessories together to build their very own Mover Kit. It’s as simple as making a LEGO house or paper airplanes – but way cooler.

Read more: Mover Kit – The first active wearable that kids make & code




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