Induction sensors don’t need a touch, they’re satisfied by proximity




Proximity sensors working on an induction principle are able to detect ferrous and non-ferrous metals very reliably.

For those of you, who already work in this field, there´s everything clear for you probably and you know well, that induction sensors are literally one of the keystones for an industrial automation. For all of you, who´re not familiar with these important components yet, we bring this short description.

Induction sensors don’t need a touch, they’re satisfied by proximity




Induction sensors use the fact, that metal parts placed near an oscillator coil are able to change condition in a given oscillating circuit. Such a change (stopping of oscillations) can be reliably evaluated and to gain a confirmation about a presence of a metal subject in the sensor´s range. Induction sensors typically work on a frequency of hundreds of Hz up to a few kHz.The bigger the size of a coil (and also a sensor), usually the higher is the resulting sensitivity of a sensor (sensing range). But at the same time a bigger sensor usually works on a lower frequency, that´s why even a maximum sensing frequency is lower. From this reason it´s usually better to use a smaller type to detect fast moving objects.

Omron, as a top class producer of industrial sensors has in its portfolio a lot of series of induction proximity sensors, in numerous versions. A typical representative of well-known widely used sensors is the Omron E2A series. E2A has increased detection range and it´s encapsulated in a body from a nickel pated brass (M12-M30) or a stainless steel (M8). A lot of versions and diameters can be found here (M8/M12/M18/M30), versions with connectors or wire leads and also shielded and unshielded versions.

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