Jetson/Tutorials/GPIO using arduino




Quickly testing a GPIO pin

To set pin GPIO_PH1 as an output:

sudo su
(Enter your user password. Defaults to "ubuntu")
  # See which pins are currently configured as GPIO, and what their state is.
  cat /sys/kernel/debug/gpio
  # Validate that the entry for the Tegra GPIO controller has a base value of 0. If not, add on whatever the base value is to the “57” in the commands below.
Jetson Tutorials GPIO


echo 57 > /sys/class/gpio/export echo out > /sys/class/gpio/gpio57/direction echo 1 > /sys/class/gpio/gpio57/value

Put a voltmeter on pin 50 (gpio57) of the 2-row header (J3A1) & pin 2 (GND) also of the 2-row header,
You should now see that it is at +1.8V. This pin is LCD_BL_PWM (GPIO_PH1). Setting it to 0:

  echo 0 > /sys/class/gpio/gpio57/value

You should now see that it is at 0.0V (roughly).

Once you’re done:

  echo 57 > /sys/class/gpio/unexport
  exit

Jetson Tutorials GPIOTurning an LED on/off or sending a signal to an Arduino microcontroller from Jetson TK1

You can now set a 1.8V voltage on a GPIO pin, but the GPIO pins on Jetson TK1 don’t have enough electrical current or power to connect directly to an LED and also, 1.8V is a lower voltage than you normally want. So the easiest way to control a single LED from Jetson TK1 is to build a transistor switch circuit, as shown in the circuit diagram (which you can download for the free KiCad package here):

Connect the red wire (+5V) to pin 1 on J3A1 of Jetson TK1 (bottom-right pin of the dual-row header, next to the text saying “DISPLAY TOUCH”) to power the LED from Jetson TK1.

 

For more detail: Jetson/Tutorials/GPIO




This Post / Project can also be found using search terms:

  • Jetson TK1 GPIO
  • tegra gpio controller base value
  • TK1 GPIO
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