30 Second Charging, Rechargeable Battery




Rechargeable batteries save us a lot of money but take a lot of time. What if you could recharge a battery in seconds instead of hours?

Rechargeable batteries save us a lot of money these days but for the savings, we give up some of our time, waiting for them to recharge. What if though. What if there was a rechargeable battery that took seconds to recharge instead of hours? That is exactly what I’ve invented and I need your help to bring this to the masses and show the world that we no longer need to waste hours of or lives waiting for a battery to charge.

With the leaps and bounds being made today with capacitors, they’ve gone from being able to store a tiny potential of energy to now, being able to store enough energy to be considered a power source. These high Farad capacitors are known as super capacitors and aside from providing electricity for an extended period of time, they can also be charged very quickly. Recently, there’s been another development, combining the technology of super capacitors with lithium ion batteries. The usually downside to super capacitors from batteries is that they don’t provide electricity for nearly as long. However, with the advent of the lithium ion capacitor, that is quickly changing.

30 Second Charging Rechargeable Battery

Basically, I’ve taken a lithium ion capacitor, which provides 3.8 volts of electricity and put it, along with a very small circuit that brings that 3.8 volts down to the usual 1.5 volts that you get out of your standard AA, C & D battery, in to a footprint that is the same size as a AA, C & D battery. When the battery dies, you simply hook it up to the charger I have designed and in less than a minute, it’s fully charged and ready to go again. Less than a minute versus the hours other batteries take. As far as how long my battery will last, per charge, I can tell you this. I put one in a toy that my 1 year old daughter plays with every day, all day. It’s been in there for a week and it’s still going strong. The capacitor has only discharged .9 volts, while the battery itself continues to provide a steady supply of 1.5 volts.

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My battery, if unused for an extended period of time, will still charge and discharge as if it were new. No loss of capability if stored away for future use.

Below are pictures of the battery in its various stages of construction. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions at all.

Remember, I need YOUR help and YOUR support to get this project off my workbench, off the ground and in to the hands of the world!

 

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