Learning Sequential Logic Design for a Digital Clock

This instructable is for two purposes 1) to understand and learn the fundamentals of sequential logic 2) use that knowledge to create a digital clock. Digital clocks have been built by countless electronics hobbyists over the world. So why have I chosen to implement that? Well usually clock circuits available on the internet (all circuits I have seen) use the 7490 counter (I have used 7493 but I will show w ...

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Simulating Logic Gates

Introduction This project is a simple way of using the Arduino to simulate the behaviour of logic gates. Logic gates are explained on this page. The project does not actually carry out the function of the logic gate, just turns a light on or off based on one or two inputs. Effectively showing the truth table for a given logic gate. You Will Need 2 x LEDs Yellow 1 x LED Red 3 x 330 Ohm Resistors 2 x 10 KOhm ...

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Tri-State Logic

Introduction So far we have sent one of two values to any Arduino output pin, either HIGH or LOW. This project shows how we can exploit a third state of the Arduino pins to reduce the number of pins needed to control LEDs. In the project, we'll control 2 LEDs using only one Arduino pin. You Will Need 4 x Diodes 2 x LEDs 2 x 330 Ohm Resistors Jumper Wires Diodes have to be the correct way around to function. ...

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Huge List of tutorials & Components based resources & info

 glossary A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A ACCELEROMETER: tutorial on using the Memsic 2125 accelerometer with Arduino/Freeduino ACCELEROMETER: another post on using the Memsic 2125 Rad*o Sha*k variant accelerometer with Arduino/Freeduino ACCELEROMETER: article on using the LIS3LV02DQ 3-axis accelerometer with Arduino/Freeduino ACCELEROMETER: an excellent article on using the ADXL330 wi ...

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Oscilloscope / Logic Analyzer using Arduino

One of the frustrating things about developing and debugging electronic circuits is that you can't look inside the circuit to see what is happening. Even with a circuit laid out before you on a workbench and powered up it may seem like you're in the dark, unable to figure out why an input change or alteration in one part of the circuit isn't having the effect you expected. Sometimes it can feel like you're ...

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