Version 2.0 Arduino Controlled Car Tracking System based on SMS




This system is upgraded version of previous project…
You will be able to track your car after you build this system,
you will call the device then it will send you an sms which includes LAT, LON and Google Map link for just one touch to see where it is.

Arduino Controlled Car Tracking System




Before you start to build them, you should connect the Wavecom to PC to adjust Serial Com. Baud Rate to 9600
then make it save this configuration via AT commands. (It is written in Wavecom AT command datasheet).

Step 1: Preparing the Wavecom For fastening the modules

Secondly, disassemble the wavecom GSM module and drill many holes for screws, our modules hold on these screws..

Step 2: Preparing the Datacable

Let’s make a datacable between Wavecom and RS232 module,
you use just 3 pinouts, it’s enough for communication..

Step 3: Connecting the other parts

Arduino Controlled Car Tracking System connecting

Now let’s connect the RS232 and GPS module to our Arduino,

We use 3 pinouts of GPS module ,
These are TX, VCC , Ground (on Skylab SKM53).
connect
GPS TX pinout —-> Arduino PIN 5
RS232 Module RX—> Arduino PIN 10
RS232 Module TX—> Arduino PIN 11
also do not forget to connect Vcc and GND pinouts of RS232 module, GPS module and Arduino

Step 4: Finishing the Tracker Device

Not fix these modules on Wavecom with silicon…
You also can connect a buzzer to PIN7 , I do it because I’ll put this device in a hidden place then power it on/off with wireless RF switch. So, I can hear the buzzer when I power it on..

Now .. upload program on arduino.. (next step)

Major Components in Project

Firstly required materials :

TTL to RS232 Module
VGA socket
SkyLab SKM53 GPS Module
Arduino Pro
Wavecom GSM modem

For more detail: Version 2.0 Arduino Controlled Car Tracking System based on SMS




Clip to Evernote

Leave a Comment

(Spamcheck Enabled)

Read previous post:
Environmental Monitoring with Arduino by Emily Gertz E-Book
Environmental Monitoring with Arduino by Emily Gertz E-Book

After the devastating tsunami in 2011, DYIers in Japan built their own devices to detect radiation levels, then posted their...

Close
Scroll to top